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>>Installation Time Machine: 65 Cameras and an electric pulse.

 

Mira Hunter Mira Hunter Mira Hunter
Mira Hunter Mira Hunter Mira Hunter
Mira Hunter Mira Hunter Mira Hunter
Mira Hunter Mira Hunter Mira Hunter
Mira Hunter Mira Hunter Mira Hunter
Mira Hunter Mira Hunter Mira Hunter

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Mira Hunter's 2008 installation piece Time Machine was created with her husband Derek Hunter, who is also a visual artist and a whirling dervish. It featured 65 disposable cameras fixed to a 360 degree rail made from reclaimed lumber, activated by electromechanical solenoids. The photographs featured Mira Hunter who is a second-generation whirling dervish. They were animated in a sequence, giving the audience the visual experience of revolving around a whirling dervish, caught in a single moment. The images, often displaying unusual exposure disturbances and anomalies, were scanned and made into two films which played simultaneously within a wooden yurt-like viewing structure, installed at the Bartlett Gallery, SFU Vancouver. The film loops, and is projected on two opposing walls. The yurt was constructed around a central load bearing beam, that is a part of the permanent gallery space. The entire structure was made from reclaimed, found or recycled materials. The roof was covered with handmade antique suzanis from Central Asia (which Mira collects) and old moving blankets. At the centre of the yurt, was a rounded bench, also covered with the same textiles as the roof. There was a single oval entrance. The bench organically wrapped and curved around the load bearing beam, and hanging on the beam were 8 sets of headphones. The soundtrack was binaurally recorded, combining traditional chanting and singing, breathing, and wind harp. The soundtrack was created while whirling and wearing the binaural recording equipment. On the back exterior, viewed through a crack in the planks, was a short stop frame animation loop, called The Happiest Molecule of All. The music for the installation of this tiny loop was a zikr from the album by Dr. Oruç Güvenc & Tümata, called Ocean of Remembrance, which was created to treat mental illness. The soundtrack for the animation was played softly from small speakers concealed in the yurt's wall, leading the viewer to discover it. The yurt was accompanied by a series of light boxes, crafted from reclaimed metal and wood, displaying transparancies of film stills.

Watch video of Time Machine >>

Watch The Happiest Molecule of All >>

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

© 2014 Mira Hunter